Common core and students accusing teachers of not teaching

So I always overhear students (high school) talk about how some teachers don't teach. Some of the teachers I hear them mention, I don't know enough about. Some I do have an idea of how they teach. And the way they teach is to let the kids explore on their own. This is especially true when it comes to open ended activities like labs. According to the kids, this amounts to the teacher not teaching. I think this is for two reasons. One, they are more accustom to the traditional teacher lecture model. And second, they are finding it difficult to think on their own so they blame the teacher.
Common core stresses rigor and more critical thinking so my guess is we're going to have an influx of student complaints in regards to teachers not teaching. What do you guys think?

It's going to be an interesting adjustment of how teachers are viewed. Is there going to be a lot less front of the room lecturing? Heck, yeah, and my vocal chords are thrilled for that. Is there going to be a lot more running around the room, working on individual questions and assessing understanding on a constant basis? Probably, and my waistline is going to appreciate that. As our thoughts on what a classroom should be changes, so will the expectations of appearances.

It is going to be an adjustment for students. I find many students think getting the answer means they are smart and have done the work. Many students don't yet understand that getting the answer is just the tip of the iceberg and that much much more is expected.

I am a front of the room lecturer but I totally respect teachers that can teach differently and get great results. I don't allow students to complain about other staff members while in my classroom but when it does from time to time I'll shut down the conversation. And I'll make sure that my students hear me say that not lecturing does not mean not teaching.

I think some teachers don't teach. I think that some teachers don't know what common core means and don't teach as a result. There are teachers who put kids in groups and say they are teaching the common core.
Discovery/inquiry/rigor are all perfectly valid teaching methods but just throwing a problem at kids and asking them to struggle with it is not any of those things. Yes there is an adjustment kids need to make but that's not an excuse for not teaching.



I think some teachers don't teach. I think that some teachers don't know what common core means and don't teach as a result. There are teachers who put kids in groups and say they are teaching the common core.
Discovery/inquiry/rigor are all perfectly valid teaching methods but just throwing a problem at kids and asking them to struggle with it is not any of those things. Yes there is an adjustment kids need to make but that's not an excuse for not teaching.



I agree that I think some teachers really don't teach. I had many of them when I was in high school. My U.S. History "teacher" told us, "Read chapter 2, answer the questions at the end" and that was that. No discussion, no teaching taking place. Textbooks, and simple Q&A worksheets.
I'm not sure if the CCSS have anything to do with the students and situations you're referring to, but teachers weren't teaching back when I was in high school 16 years ago.

I have heard one or two students say that for a different reason...if I put a question on the test that isn't exactly like a problem we did in class (but just with different numbers) but that tests the same concepts, they claim it is isn't fair and they weren't taught that. They don't want to think, and they just want all problems identical to what we've done in class, which won't help them with much.

I believe teachers should guide their students, facilate discussions and create learning experiences with minimal lecturing. Lecture is necessary, but it doesn´t require much from the students. The teacher should be very involved as the students take on active learning roles. Could this be perceived as not teaching from the view point of a student? I honestly don´t know. I wouldn´t immediately think so, but I could be wrong. If a teacher is doing his or her job and asking probing questions, helping to clear up misunderstandings, and guiding students through their learning then I would think there would be little doubt as to whether the teacher is teaching. Perhaps these are teachers who truly are not teaching?

It's something students will get used to as the next generation sees new practices as the norm.

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